No Picture
Family Tips for Saving Money

Choosing The Graco Duoglider For Your Children

For one small child a single stroller was fine but if you have baby number two or twins on the way you will need to look into getting a double stroller. One double stroller you can consider is the Graco Duoglider. Graco is known for its quality of product and design. This stroller has features you will want to have.
The Graco Duoglider is designed with a back and front seat. It takes up less space when going through doorways than a side by side model. It measures about twenty inches from side to side. You want to be able to get around with the children with as much ease as possible. The Graco stroller fits this bill.
When the little ones are just infants they can also use this stroller. Both the front and back seats allow the use of the SnugRide infant car seat. Babies cannot ride in a normal stroller seat until they have more neck support. You need to be able to clip an infant car seat into a stroller. This stroller is designed to do just that.
When they are no longer in the infant car seats the children will enjoy their ride in the regular stroller seats. The seats are able to recline to allow the toddler to rest. The children also have foot rests and the front seat has a tray and cup holder. The back seat is elevated so the child can see up and over the front seat.
There are also design items that are made for parents. There is a tray made to hold cups or smaller items like keys and cell phones. These make things easier for the adults.
The Graco Duoglider is easy to get in the car. It is collapsible with the one hand. This is an important feature since the other hand is usually full. Any parent knows that packing kids in the car can be a challenge. Anything that can make it easier is a blessing.…

No Picture
Family Tips for Saving Money

Parenting: Getting Comfortable With Discomfort

When do you stand up for your child, and when do you let her figure it out on her own?
Remember that moment just before your baby was born when the doctor said, “You may feel some pressure”? You may have thought the doctor was referring to just the next few minutes; but it is possible that there was no time limit on that pressure. We feel pressure to provide the best nutrition, shelter and education. We sacrifice, smile and cajole our way through parenthood. We grow accustomed to exhaustion and compromise and learn to be accepting of the human condition on a much deeper level. We even become less judgmental and more grateful. In the midst of this, a living, breathing child trusts, loves and utterly depends on us; but hey, no pressure.
I can’t tell you how many times I have heard frustrated parents lament a situation at school, or a play date or even a family gathering that made the parent feel uncomfortable or even feel sorry for their child. Life is unfair and what should we do when our child gets the short end of the stick?
For me, it really depends on both the setting and the frequency. I’m all for letting a child learn to stand up for him or herself, if there is a basic level of fairness. I’m also all for getting involved when a child is in over their head. Only a parent can determine when to get involved, but I firmly believe that children need their parents to be ready, willing and able to advocate for them. Learning to advocate for our children in a way that builds bridges rather than burning them is a crucial parenting skill.
At school or at the pediatrician or even at a play date, there are moments when we need to advocate for, defend and speak up for our children. Some of the greatest growth spurts in childhood are not made by the children at all, but by brave parents who loathe confrontation, but do it anyway because they must.
Whether we simply remove our child from an unfair play date, or insist that we see a specialist at the emergency room, we are our child’s best and often only advocates.
It is our right and privilege to stand up for our children and it is how we show them that we believe, trust and love them even up to and beyond our own comfort level. We all tell our kids we love them, but those moments of advocacy are the times we show them. In those moments they discover our character and our priorities and it is what builds the foundation of strong and healthy relationships as they grow up.
For a teenager to know their parent has their back when they genuinely need the back up, is huge and often the difference between the courage to talk to a parent and the choice to pull away. Knowing that your mom or dad believes you are someone worth standing up for is the highest approval a teen can get in a world that often disrespects their whole generation just as a matter of principle.
So, here we are, under pressure and getting comfortable with the discomfort, standing together and standing up for what we believe in and the ones we love. I think that may be the greatest legacy we leave our children.
In the meantime, remember to keep your face to the sun so all the shadows will fall behind.…