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Good Relationship

Safety Concerns With Certain Age Groups

Toys come with a recommended age range for a few reasons. First of all, it has a lot to do with development levels. If a book is recommended for a twelve year old or older, that doesn’t mean that your eight year old can’t handle it, just that most eight year olds cannot. If your kid has already graduated from Doctor Seuss and Golden Books, they might be ready for the real literary experience waiting for them in the pages of Lord of the Flies or Winnie the Pooh.
Another reason for the age range is, of course, safety. Safety has more to do with physical development than mental or emotional development. The Haynes Internal Combustion engine is great for a kid who has grown strong enough to handle simple tools and carry slightly heavy parts. It’s recommended for kids aged eight to sixteen for reasons of both physical and mental development. A six year old would probably find it a bit cumbersome to put together when the engine block itself ways almost as much as they do.
If your six year old is the size of an eight year old, though, then you don’t have that to worry about. Safety issues are different from child to child just as mental development is different from child to child.
Under six years or so, though, you should probably be willing to treat these safety concerns as the gospel. Choking hazards are a very real threat, as are pointy, heavy, and delicate objects.
To break safety concerns down into age groups…
Infants
For baby toys, you really do want to regard the safety precautions with a lot of respect. Every toy you give a kid aged zero to twelve months needs to be a number of things in order to be safe. It has to be soft, it has to be devoid of anything like buttons that can easily snap off, and it has to be comfortable to cuddle with.
Toddlers
With toddlers, you want to avoid getting too complex with the toys. They can now handle plenty of toys with moving parts, but nothing easily broken, nothing with a lot of pointy corners, nothing that’s too heavy for them to safely lift, and you still want to be aware of choking hazards.
Small Children
Now it starts to get a little trickier. Some kids shoot up a foot or two between the ages of four and five, while others stay around the same size until they’re nearly seven or eight years old. At this point, you have to look at the safety precautions on the package and then exercise your own knowledge of your child’s development levels, physical and mental. And be honest with yourself! We all want to believe our kids are geniuses, but most five year olds just aren’t ready for a Technics Lego toy just yet. So try to stick to the recommended age range for now.
Here’s kind of a silly rule, but it’s a good gauge of your child’s physical growth. Next time you go grocery shopping, if your kid can easily carry a gallon of milk into the house and put it in the fridge without dropping it, he or she may be ready for toys recommended for eight year olds, but still, make sure to practice common sense and don’t give them anything that would make you nervous!…

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Good Relationship

How to Help a Friend Who Has Lost a Family Member Without Making Things Worse

Sooner or later you will need advice for helping a friend who has lost a family member- and when the time comes, this book is one of the best on the topic. The title sums it up well:
Don’t Ask for the Dead Man’s Golf Clubs – What to Do and Say (and What Not to) When a Friend Loses a Loved One.
This book by Lynn Kelly is written in short sections formed from interviews with those who have personal experiences with loss. I bought it when my friend’s father was dying of cancer, and my own father had been diagnosed with lymphoma. (And, no I didn’t ask for his golf clubs.) It was a great help.
Lynn Kelly covers what really eased the pain for people who had lost a loved one. It also covers very clearly what others said and did which brought more hurt to them. However, isn’t it better to know what not to say? Sometimes when friends experience a tragedy we say little or nothing, or even pull away, maybe telling ourselves that they need time alone to grieve. We may fear that we will say or do the wrong thing. This book helps solve these problems. You’ll know what helped others and read samples of what it is better not to say. You won’t leave your friend feeling abandoned.
One point that is covered well is that promises should be kept. The person may really depend on your taking their kids to an event now and then, if you said that you would, and the kids may really look forward to it. But sometimes promises like that are forgotten by the one who made them, disappointing the young person. It is not always 100% convenient to keep a promise but in this case it is much more important than usual.
Sometimes we think that the person who suffered a loss would prefer not to have the name of their loved one come up in conversations and random memories. Yet family members have not forgotten their loved one and never will. They generally don’t mind hearing good memories which include their loved one, and feel better knowing that someone else remembers them as well.
Some loses are within the range of events that we expect to happen sooner or later in life- such as the loss of an elderly parent. At those times we still need the encouragement and support of friends. However if a family member is lost “before their time” the remaining members need the support and care of friends even more — though friends might be more uncertain of what to say and do. This book covers these topics well.…